MyOGEpower.com Help


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How do I enable cookies?

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To enable cookies in Safari (Mac):

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To enable cookies in Google Chrome (Windows):

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To enable cookies in Google Chrome (Mac):

  1. Select the wrench icon in the top-right corner of the window.
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How do I clear my cookies?

Note that, in Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome, you can set exceptions for MyOGEpower.com, so that, when you clear cookies, the MyOGEpower.com cookies are not removed.

To clear your cookies in Microsoft Internet Explorer (Windows):

  1. Select Tools > Internet Options > General
  2. Under Browsing History, click Delete.
  3. Select only Cookies.
  4. Click Delete.
  5. In Internet Options, click OK.

To clear your cookies in Mozilla Firefox (Windows):

  1. Click Tools > Options.
  2. Click Privacy.
  3. Select Use custom settings for history from the drop-down list.
  4. Click Show Cookies.
  5. Click Remove All Cookies, or Remove Cookies for selected sites or cookies..
  6. Close the Cookies window.
  7. Click OK.

To clear your cookies in Mozilla Firefox (Mac):

  1. Select Firefox > Preferences.
  2. Click Privacy.
  3. Select Use custom settings for history from the drop-down list.
  4. Click Show Cookies.
  5. Click Remove All Cookies, or Remove Cookies for selected sites or cookies.
  6. Close the Cookies window, and close the Privacy window.

To clear your cookies in Safari (Mac):

  1. Select Safari > Preferences.
  2. Click Security.
  3. Click Show Cookies.
  4. Click Remove All, or Remove for selected cookies.
  5. Click Done.
  6. Close the Security window.

To clear your cookies in Google Chrome (Windows):

  1. Select the wrench icon in the top-right corner of the window.
  2. Select Options > Under the Hood.
  3. In the Privacy section, click Content Settings.
  4. Click All cookies and site data.
  5. Click Remove All, or you can remove individual cookies by site (use the x at the right end of a selected row) or by cookie (expand the cookie and click Remove at the bottom of the expanded view).
  6. Close the Options tab.

To clear your cookies in Google Chrome (Mac):

  1. Select the wrench icon in the top-right corner of the window.
  2. Select Preferences > Under the Hood.
  3. In the Privacy section, click Content Settings.
  4. Click All Cookies and Site Data.
  5. Click Remove All, or you can remove individual cookies by site (use the x at the right end of a selected row) or by cookie (expand the cookie and click Remove at the bottom of the expanded view).
  6. Close the Preferences tab.

What are the system requirements for MyOGEpower.com

MyOGEpower.com has been designed to work on any modern PC or embedded device with full web browser capabilities. You might note some rendering inconsistencies across the various browsers due to differences in how each browser platform handles rendering of fonts or HTML/CSS. Adobe Flash is not required. Specifically, MyOGEpower.com supports web browsers Microsoft Internet Explorer 8 and 9 (Windows), Mozilla Firefox 3.6.x and 4 (Windows and Mac), Apple Safari 4.0 or later (Mac), and Google Chrome 5.0 or later (Windows and Mac). You must also have cookies enabled in your web browser.

What if I find a bug?

We would appreciate it if you could report it. This information will be used to improve MyOGEpower.com. Please contact us to report bugs.

Equipment in your residence or small business that uses the most electricity

By one estimate, lighting (at 25%) and office equipment (at 16%) can use the most energy at commercial locations. For all equipment, you can reduce your home or business electricity costs significantly if you focus attention on some of the following systems and devices in particular if you have them at your location:

  • Air conditioning (including whole building and portable)
  • Clothes Driers
  • Computers and accessories (including passive power supplies)
  • Dishwashers
  • Electric blankets
  • Electric heating (including whole building and portable)
  • Electric water heaters
  • Electronics (including passive power supplies)
  • Fans
  • Lighting (especially incandescent bulbs)
  • Power Tools
  • Refrigerators and freezers
  • Television sets (including passive power supplies)
  • Washing machines

Equipment at your medium business, or commercial and industrial (C&I) business that uses the most electricity

Medium to large businesses (including commercial & industrial) often have specialized equipment and systems onsite that can have major impacts on electricity use and costs. By one estimate, machine drives (at 59%) and process heating (at 19%) can use the most energy at C&I locations. Also significant are lighting (at 25%) and office equipment (at 16%) for commercial locations. For all equipment, if you want to reduce your costs, you should focus attention on some of the following types in particular if you have them at your location:

  • Air handlers
  • Anti-sweat heaters
  • Chillers (including controllers)
  • Clean rooms
  • Customer transaction and accounting systems
  • Data centers
  • Defroster components
  • Elevators
  • Escalators
  • HVAC (including controllers)
  • Industrial motors and pumps (including controllers)
  • Irrigation controllers
  • Lighting (internal and external, and including illuminated signs)
  • Production devices and equipment
  • Processing line equipment
  • Refrigeration systems
  • Servers and related equipment
  • Swimming pool and spa electric heating systems
  • Telephone systems
  • Water cooling systems

Technical terms

Automated Meter Reading (AMR):
A form of advanced metering that uses communications devices to send data from the meter to the utility. This includes simple energy consumption data to outage detection and over-the-air meter programming.
critical peak pricing (CPP):
A hybrid of time of use and real-time pricing. Utilities charge fixed time of use rates for preset periods but might charge higher rates during extreme supply conditions. Customers are notified in advance of the price change, allowing them time to curtail demand.
cumulative demand:
The sum of the previous billing period’s max demands. At the time of demand reset, the maximum demand (peak demand) of the previous billing period is added to the previous accumulated total of all max demands.
daily peak:
The greatest amount of electricity used during a certain period in a day, such as an hour, half-hour, or quarter hour.
declining block rate:
An electricity billing rate that decreases across tiers with the customer’s electricity use.
inclining block rate:
An electricity billing rate that increases across tiers with the customer’s energy use.
kVAh:
kilovolt ampere hours.
kVAR:
kilovolt ampere hour reactive. A measure of reactive energy usage.
kVAR lag:
The inductive reactance, or how much the voltage lags the current, of the circuit.
kVAR lead:
The capacitive reactance, or how much the voltage leads the current, of the circuit. See also reactive power.
kVARh:
kilovolt ampere hour reactive hours. A unit of energy equivalent to one kVAR of power expended for one hour.
kW:
Kilowatt. A unit of power equal to 1000 watts.
kWh:
Kilowatt-hour. A unit of electricity equal to one kilowatt (kW) of power expended for one hour. Similar measurements apply for megawatt (MW) and megawatt-hour (MWh), and gigawatt (GW) and gigawatt-hour (GWh).
maximum demand (peak demand):
The highest demand measured over a selected period of time (typically within a billing period).
minimum demand:
The lowest demand measured over a selected period of time.
off-peak:
Related to electricity use during periods of time when prices tend to be lowest due to decreased demand.
on-peak:
Related to electricity use during periods of time when prices tend to be highest due to increased demand.
peak demand:
The maximum level of use by customers of a system during a specified period.
reactive energy:
Energy measured by kVARh.
reactive power:
Power measured as volt-amperes reactive (on this page, in kVAR). By convention, lagging (inductive) loads, such as motors, have positive reactive power, while leading (capacitive) loads have negative reactive power.
tier:
Under tiered rate plans, the customer's cost per kilowatt hour (kWh) changes as more electricity is used within a billing period. Depending on your price plan, this cost can either go up or down at higher tiers.
time of use (TOU):
An electricity billing rate where the rate varies by time. TOU metering divides the day into periods, such as 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM, 12:00 PM to 4:00 PM, and 4:00 PM to 8:00 AM. Each period has a corresponding rate, expressed in terms of $/kWh, where $ is the currency type configured for your rate plans (for example, $0.05/kWh). The rate is usually based on expected average cost (where prices are usually higher during peak periods) and is generally fixed for several months in advance. Rates can also change seasonally.
variable peak pricing (VPP):
A power billing structure whereby rates can vary throughout the day depending on system load conditions.
ZigBee:
A specification for a suite of high-level communication protocols using small, low-power digital radios. A wireless network used for home, building and industrial control. It operates in the 2.4 GHz (ISM) radio band. The specification supports data transmission rates of up to 250 kbps at a range of up to 30 meters.
W:
A measurement of power equal to volts multiplied by amps.